Lions Clubs International Century of Service Commemorative Coin Act – Update

Senator Jerry MoranIn recognition of our 100th Anniversary in 2017, LCI is leading efforts to mint 400,000 silver dollars. This is the first step to commemorate our centennial – while raising millions to support our global mission areas for the visually impaired, disabled, youth and those affected by disaster. Lions from all over the globe are exploring similar commemorative campaigns locally.

How much is a Lions silver dollar worth? Read the feature article in the September 2011 issue of the LION magazine.

In June, the “Lions Clubs International Century of Service Commemorative Coin Act,” S. 1299/H.R. 2139, was introduced in the U.S. Congress by Senator Jerry Moran, a Lion, and Congressman Peter Roskam thanks to Sandy Spring Lions Club, District 22-C, who formally proposed this opportunity to publicize our accomplishments and raise funds for the Lions Clubs International Foundation.

Thanks to your efforts to contact our lawmakers, we’ve reached 39% of our goal in the U.S. House and 36% of our goal in the U.S. Senate. Congratulations to PDG David Orr and Lions of Wyoming, District 15, for securing all Wyoming House and Senate legislators as co-sponsors! Also, congratulations to the Pago Pago Lions Clubs, the Territory of American Samoa, for securing their sole Representative in the House as a co-sponsor.

113 co-sponsors in the U.S. House of Representatives

0

290

39%

24 co-sponsors in the U.S. Senate

0

67

36%

View full list of House of Representatives sponsors View full list of Senate sponsors

Take Part in Our Commemorative Coin Campaign to Help Raise Millions for LCIF

How much is a Lions’ silver dollar worth? About $8 million. That’s how much we hope to raise for LCIF if the U.S. Congress passes a commemorative coin bill honoring the centennial of Lions in 2017.

Getting Congressional approval is not automatic. Congress passes only two commemorative coin bills each year. But many Lions including past international presidents, past international directors and other members are lobbying their congressional representatives to pass the bi-partisan legislation. If approved, the U.S. Mint will produce as many as 400,000 coins. After the U.S. Mint recovers its cost, a $10 surcharge for every coin sold will go to LCIF and its programs for the visually impaired, the disabled, youths and victims of natural disasters.

The commemorative coin idea originated with two members of the Sandy Spring Lions Club in Maryland. Brother Meredith Pattie, a past district governor, and Alan Ballard were at a luncheon for Melvin Jones Fellows when they began to brainstorm ways to support LCIF.

“Our first idea was a coin for the 50th anniversary of the death of Melvin Jones [in 1961]. But we realized we were too late for that,” says Pattie. They eventually formed a nine-person Lions’ committee from District 22 C that includes Past International Director Joseph Gaffigan.

Co-sponsors of the Lions Clubs International Century of Service Commemorative Coin Act, H.R. 2139, are Rep. Peter Roskam, whose district in Illinois includes Oak Brook and LCI headquarters, and Rep. Larry Kissell,  from North Carolina who is a Lion. Another Lion, Senator Jerry Moran from Kansas, introduced the bill, S. 1299, in that chamber. The bill needs 290 co-sponsors in the U. S. House and 67 co-sponsors in the U.S. Senate to pass.

We ask all Lions to write or call their representatives to urge them to co-sponsor H.R. 2139. Our Web site offers tips on contacting lawmakers and includes a regularly updated tally of number of co-sponsors.