Cooper County farmer wins $2,500 for Bunceton Lions Club

by: Boonville Daily News

Bunceton —

Keith Bail of Boonville has been selected as a winner in the America’s Farmers Grow Communities program, which gave farmers the opportunity to win $2,500 for their favorite local nonprofit organizations.

The Monsanto Fund sponsors the program, and winning farmers designate a local nonprofit organization to benefit from the donations. Bail has designated Bunceton Lions Club Building Project, located in Bunceton, to receive the donation.

Bail said he is very excited to have been selected as the winner for Cooper County. “We’re excited that we can better our rural community through the Grow Communities program.”

Brian Emde, Bunceton Lions Club President, said, “Being in a small rural community, the Bunceton Lions Club has to have many fundraising events over several years to provide funds needed for a major project. These funds will be used to help us provide handicap access to our facility, so we can be an even greater community resource. Our thanks to the Monsanto Fund and Keith Bail who provided the opportunity. The Bunceton Lions Club is both honored and grateful.”

The $2,500 donation was awarded at a ceremony held April 11 at the Bunceton Lions Club.

In more than 1,200 eligible counties, farmers can win $2,500 for their favorite community non-profit. The Monsanto Fund expects to invest more than $3 million in local communities. Previous Grow Communities projects resulted in the donation of nearly $1.2 million in 477 counties in Arkansas, California, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, and South Dakota. In total, more than $320,000 has been donated to nonprofits in Missouri.

The America’s Farmers Grow Communities program is part of a broad commitment by the Monsanto Fund, the philanthropic arm of Monsanto Company, to highlight the important contributions farmers make every day to our society by helping them grow their local communities. To date, more than 60,000 farmers participated in the program, which is designed to benefit nonprofit groups such as ag youth, schools and other civic organizations. Visit www.growcommunities.com to view a complete list of winners.

Lions reach out to family

By Cheryl Keenan Editor

FAYETTEVILLE — “We Serve.”

That motto is familiar in communities around the world as the motto of the local Lions Club.

Lions Clubs are most well-known for their support of sight programs, adopted in 1925 following a challenge from Helen Keller. According to Lions Club’s International’s website at www.lionsclubs.org, “Helen Keller addressed the Lions Clubs International Convention in Cedar Point, Ohio, and challenged Lions to become ‘knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness.’ Since then, we have worked tirelessly to aid the blind and visually impaired.”

Beyond their efforts to aid those suffering from vision loss, however, each local Lions Club supports a number of other philanthropic programs.

Locally, the members of the Fayetteville Lions Club recently adopted a crusade that’s near to their hearts: raising funds to support a local family whose 4-year-old son has cancer.

“We’re trying to help out what we can,” said Lion Gary Holliday.

“We do stuff for lots of people,” said Lion Steve Tyra, “so here’s a face we can put on it that’s familiar to our community.”

Dustin Moore has an inoperable tumor in the brain stem/spine area, according to Tyra, and the youngster is required to take extensive radiation treatments to keep the tumor from growing.

“They’re just regular middle income folks with insurance,” Tyra said, “but the bills are running the family in the hold just trying to keep up with it.

“Mom and Dad have both used up all their time off to go to Morgantown for treatment, and the grandparents are helping. When we learned about it, we knew we had to do something.

“It was almost like Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney getting together and saying, ‘We’ve got a place; I’ve got some costumes. Let’s put on a show!’ Before we knew it we had people donating items and we didn’t have anywhere to store them.”

The ‘show’ is set for Saturday, April 2 beginning at 9 a.m. at the Fayetteville Church of God activity building and will include an auction, a flea market and a barbecue sale.

“When you tell the story, people are quick to help,” Tyra said. “They say, ‘How much do you need?’ or “What can I do to help?’”

Among the items donated thus far for the auction are two special celebrity items. Rock musician Alice Cooper has donated a new black Fender guitar which he autographed, and West Virginia University and Los Angeles Lakers basketball legend Jerry West sent the Lions a #44 West Virginia cap in blue and gold, which also is autographed.

Besides the celebrity items, though, the Lions have a number of high-end items up for auction, including an electric hospital bed, solid gold coins, a brand new tree stand, exercise equipment, TVs, VCRs, DVDs, a grandfather clock, compound bows and more.

Several area companies are providing support to the Lions and the Dustin Moore Fund, including Pepsi, which will be providing all the drinks for the day, and Gumbo’s, which will donate 10 percent of its sales for the day to the fund.

“We also have a number of collection canisters up around the area,” Holliday said.

For those who would like to make a donation to the Dustin Moore Fund, Tyra said, you may do so at any Fayette County National Bank branch.

But Tyra said even those who wish to make a donation also should join in the activities on April 2.

“We just really want a good turnout to help this family,” he said.

Uniontown, Ohio Based Mortgage Broker Reveals 3 Things Lenders Don’t Want You to Know About Shopping for a Mortgage Online

niontown, Ohio based Mortgage Broker Justin Phillips reveals 3 things you should watch out for when shopping for home-finance products on the Internet.

Uniontown, OH — (SBWIRE) — 03/28/2011 — Uniontown, Ohio Based Mortgage Broker Reveals 3 Things Lenders Don’t Want You to Know About Shopping for a Mortgage Online

Anyone who’s even remotely interested in shopping for a home loan has probably paid attention to all those commercials on TV touting the ease of using any of a variety of Internet services to compare mortgage offers from the comfort of your home. You may even have tried a couple of them yourself. But Justin Phillips, a Loan Officer with Mid Ohio Mortgage, says Uniontown, Ohio residents need to watch out when trying to use the Internet to do the heavy lifting for them.

“Sometimes, these Internet services might work fairly well for certain people.” “But the one-size-fits-all approach they offer is going to leave a lot of people with loans that aren’t the best for them, or even worse, they may be shut out of the process altogether.”

Justin Phillips says the problem with these services is that they never really get to know anything about your financial situation other than your credit history and income level. “So basically what winds up happening is that you’re reduced to a number to them. And if they don’t like whatever that number is, you’re out of luck.”

Here are three things you should watch out for when shopping for home-finance products on the Internet – things most online mortgage sites hope you ignore:

*Do they take the time to find out about your unique situation, or are you just a cyber-borrower in their eyes? Most of these sites simply don’t have the manpower to individually work with every borrower. So a lot of times you wind up with a bad loan simply because there was no one to check if they could have gotten you a better deal.

*What do they offer people in special financial circumstances – such as the self-employed or people with damaged credit? Most of these sites don’t even want to work with you unless you meet their stringent criteria.

*Do they provide advice to help when choosing between loan products? Most sites simply gather offers, throw them in your lap, and pressure you to choose between them. Unless you’re a pretty experienced mortgage pro, deciding on the best offer can be difficult, if not impossible.

So, what’s the solution? Use the Internet to educate yourself and then work with a real human being. You may not have thought about “old-fashioned” methods of finding the best deal, such as working with a mortgage broker. “But for anyone who values a real person sitting down with you and working through the process, there’s no better option,” says Phillips.

Uniontown, Ohio – based mortgage expert Justin Phillips specializes in providing information to Ohio residents that allows them to make informed decisions about their mortgage financing options and learn the insider secrets that can save them thousands of dollars over the life of their loan.

Justin Phillips is available for interviews and will welcome all your mortgage related questions.

Washington Post: Gov. Kasich and His Bold Plans to Fix Ohio

KASICH FAMILY PHOTOGovernor John Kasich recently spoke with Jennifer Rubin from the Washington Post about Ohio’s Jobs Budget and his efforts to restore jobs and prosperity back to our great state. You can read more here and share your thoughts below:

It’s been more than 10 years since Republican John Kasich left the House. But he’s lost none of his youthful exuberance. In a real sense he carries the spirit of the late Jack Kemp, the quintessential Republican reformer who combined blue-collar appeal with a wonkish love of policy.

In a far-ranging telephone interview yesterday afternoon, Kasich showed why he’s regarded as one of the most aggressive reformers among the new crop of Republican governors. It’s clear he’s working hard. He jokes, “This is the first time in a long time I’ve gone two days without exercising and I’m not sick.” He says with relish, “I’m extremely busy.”

That’s an understatement. I wanted to talk to him about SB 5, the measure to severely curtail public employee bargaining rights and require employees to increase their contributions. (An analysis provided by his spokesman shows that had the measure been in place last year, it would have saved local governments in the state $1.1 billion.) Kasich tells me, “We’ve unveiled the most comprehensive reform budget people have seen in a generation.” The union reform is key, but “it’s only one element” to allow local governments to control their costs. He notes that under the bill public-employee unions can still negotiate for wages and working conditions, but not health care and pension benefits. It would also end public-employee union strikes and automatic pay increases.

Kasich explains that the equation between public employees and taxpayers needs to be “rebalanced,” with the idea that the taxpayers through their elected officials should control the state budget. He points to troubling examples of how the balance has gotten out of whack: “We’re in the bottom 10 [among states] in dollars in the classroom, and the top 10 in dollars for administration.” He continues to rattle off examples in which Ohio and its taxpayers have lost control of government finances. “The city of Mansfield,” he explains, “is on the way to bankruptcy.” He denies accusations that he is out to get the unions. “Nothing could be farther from the truth,” he says. He points to some compelling math: The average Ohioan must pay 23 percent.of his own health care; government workers pay only 9 percent.

He quickly returns to his main point: The union bill is only one of a long list of reforms that include Medicaid reform, prison reform, a strategy to use profits from state-run liquor businesses to fund a public-private job-creation entity to replace the state development department, and a massive overhaul of education (including lifting caps on charter schools, increasing school vouchers, ending “last hired/first fired” teacher tenure rules and inviting Teach America participants to come into the schools.) Moreover, he says, “we’ve asked state agencies, departments and bureaus to come in with savings below last year’s [budget].”

He says the business community has noticed the change. A major developer in the state who controls tens of millions of square feet of commercial real estate shared with him that “there is a real buzz among the business community that the [Kasich] administration really does get it.” He reels off a list of job-creation efforts. It includes a new warehouse, a new motion picture to shoot in the state and successful outreach to California business. Of the last, he cracks, “We sent a delegation to that foreign country — California.” He relates that of the 20 companies they met with, “12 expressed an interest” in Ohio.

But the glass-half-full governor says that because his predecessor so mismanaged the state’s budget he is able to make visible progress rather quickly.

A case in point is Medicaid. Kasich has been crisis-crossing the state selling Ohio voters on a revamp of the Medicaid system. That includes shifting resources from nursing home care to home-based care and moving to outcome-based medical care. (Kasich says the nursing home industry is a vested interest and a lonely voice that has opposed the change.) Kasich is negotiating with the federal Department of Health and Human Services to allow the system of long-term care to be streamlined.

Kasich is generally pleased with the level of bipartisan support for his agenda, although he notes that this is more true in the state Senate than in the House. (A transportation bill passed overwhelming in the state Senate but along party lines in the House.) He says, “I’m a believer in bipartisanship.” While his Democratic opponents may look at him as the “enemy,” he says, “I don’t look at life that way.”

Five People Accused for Role in Ohio Bank Fraud Scheme

by Alex Ferreras on March 23, 2011

(LoanSafe.org) – Last Friday it was reported that John Townsend, of Akron Ohio, Samer Sammor, of Uniontown Ohio, LaMont McBride, of Cleveland, Ohio, Alicia Caldwell, of Inkster, Michigan and Wade Tyus, of Cleveland, Ohio were all charged with 10 counts, which included the plan to scheme, the actual bank fraud and forged securities.According to the indictment, it’s alleged that from February 2005 until March 2006 the defendants had all been conspiring together and with others to commit bank fraud with stolen checks. The checks were reported to be stolen from the mail room at the Eaton Center in downtown Cleveland, Ohio.

The charges go on to accuse the defendants of defrauding several Cleveland area bank branches out of hundreds of thousands of dollars by depositing stolen or counterfeit checks into fraudulent business accounts and withdrawing or transferring the funds from the years 2003-2006. These banks include National City Bank, Huntington Bank, Charter One Bank, and U.S. Bank.

If convicted for these crimes, the defendants will face a good sentencing, just like all the other fraudsters that get caught daily. Indictments are simply charges and do not come with sentencing, but with evidence that points directly at them it’s likely that they will be caught, and apprehended properly for what they’ve done. In recent cases posted by the FBI, defendants generally have pleaded guilty in under 2 weeks of the start of the case.

Lions auction to help boy’s family

Buckley Lions ClubBy Cheryl Keenan For The Register-Herald

“We Serve.”

That motto is familiar in communities around the world as the motto of the local Lions Club.

Lions Clubs are most well-known for their support of sight programs, adopting in 1925 a response to a challenge from Helen Keller. According to the Lions Club’s International’s website at www.lionsclubs.org, “Helen Keller addressed the Lions Clubs International Convention in Cedar Point, Ohio, and challenged Lions to become ‘knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness.’ Since then, we have worked tirelessly to aid the blind and visually impaired.”

Beyond their efforts to aid those suffering from vision loss, however, each local Lions Club supports a number of other philanthropic programs.

Locally, the members of the Fayetteville Lions Club recently adopted a crusade that’s near to their hearts — raising funds to support a local family whose 4-year-old son has cancer.

“We’re trying to help out what we can,” said Lion Gary Holliday.

“We do stuff for lots of people,” said Lion Steve Tyra, “so here’s a face we can put on it that’s familiar to our community.”

Dustin Moore has an inoperable tumor in the brain stem/spine area, according to Tyra, and the youngster is required to take extensive radiation treatments to keep the tumor from growing.

“They’re just regular, middle-income folks with insurance,” Tyra said, “but the bills are running the family in the hole just trying to keep up with it.

“Mom and Dad have both used up all their time off to go to Morgantown for treatment, and the grandparents are helping. When we learned about it, we knew we had to do something.

“It was almost like Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney getting together and saying, ‘We’ve got a place; I’ve got some costumes. Let’s put on a show!’ Before we knew it we had people donating items, and we didn’t have anywhere to store them.”

The ‘show’ is set for Saturday, April 2, beginning at 9 a.m. at the Fayetteville Church of God activity building and will include an auction, a flea market and a barbecue sale.

“When you tell the story, people are quick to help,” Tyra said. “They say, ‘How much do you need?’ or ‘What can I do to help?’”

Among the items donated thus far for the auction are two special celebrity items. Rock musician Alice Cooper has donated a new black Fender guitar that he autographed, and West Virginia University and Los Angeles Lakers basketball legend Jerry West sent the Lions a No. 44 West Virginia cap in blue and gold, which also is autographed.

Besides the celebrity items, though, the Lions have a number of high-end items up for auction, including an electric hospital bed, solid gold coins, a new tree stand, exercise equipment, TVs, VCRs, DVDs, a grandfather clock, compound bows and more.

Several area companies are providing support to the Lions and the Dustin Moore Fund, including Pepsi, which will be providing all the drinks for the day, and Gumbo’s, which will donate 10 percent of its sales for the day to the fund.

“We also have a number of collection canisters up around the area,” Holliday said.

Meet The Canidates – Sponsored by the Uniontown Business Association

We have invited all candidates running for United States Representative and Ohio Representatives for the districts in Stark and Summit Counties and all candidates running for the Ohio State Senate for Stark and Summit Counties to address our members and guests at our next meeting.

Please join us

Monday, October 18 11:45am – 1: 15pm

Grace United Church of Christ13275 Cleveland Ave. NW Uniontown, Ohio 44685

Attendance is free and you are welcome to bring guests. Please RSVP to

MINDY COVINGTON AT 330-699-3084 or

SANDY KISAK AT 330-493-9200

Local Lions clubs fear closing down due to lack of volunteers

By COLIN MCEVOY – The Express-Times

More than 20 years ago, the Bushkill Township Lions Club raised the money to build a pavilion for the township park that is still used today. Two months ago, the once active club was forced to disband due to a lack of volunteers.

“We just didn’t have enough members, so we decided to drop it,” said Cliff Bonney, 84, one of the club’s founding members and one of eight still active when the club finally closed. Once among the leaders of local volunteer organizations, the Bushkill group is not the only local Lions Club to have lost some of its roar in recent years. The Nazareth Lions Club, which has served the borough for 84 years, had 154 members when current President Charles Roth joined in 1954.

Now it only has about 16. Roth was so concerned about its lack of volunteers he wrote an open letter to borough residents claiming the club might have to fold if it did not get more members.

“When did volunteerism start to diminish in the United States?” Roth asked. “It’s just a lack of willingness to do things for other people. It’s a selfishness.” About 410,000 people are in Lions clubs throughout the United States, a drop of about 3,000 members from last year, according to Dane LaJoye, Lions Clubs International spokesman.

Membership hit its nationwide peak in the mid-1980s with about 560,000 volunteers, he said. Local members said they have not seen young people join in the same numbers as they did decades ago. When the Bushkill club closed, most of the eight remaining volunteers were founding members and almost all of them were retired men in their 80s, Bonney said.

“No young guys like we had years ago,” he said. LaJoye said people younger than 30 still volunteer but tend to do it episodically. They’ll coach their son or daughter’s soccer team this year, but maybe they won’t next year,” LaJoye said. “This month they’ll volunteer at their church, but maybe next year they won’t. So they’re volunteering, but they’re not joining.”

Other service clubs have seen problems with declining volunteers. The Phillipsburg Area Jaycees was unable to coordinate the Phillipsburg-Easton Halloween parade this year due in part to such problems. The event was saved only at the last minute when the Warren County Regional Chamber of Commerce took responsibility for organizing it. Chamber President Robert Goltz said volunteerism has dropped in part because businesses have stopped supporting it financially.

“They still do, but they don’t support it on their dime,” Goltz said. “In the past, the banks would say, ‘OK, you’re required to volunteer so many hours, but we’re going to pay you for those hours.’ That is gone.” Many Lions clubs have tried new methods to keep up volunteerism, including appealing to families and starting “cyber-clubs” with more online participation, LaJoye said.

John Cooke, past president and current member of the Palmer Township Lions Club, said his group has tried to brainstorm ways to bring in new members, but has found many people simply don’t have the time. The Palmer club has 18 members, down from 54 when Cooke joined in 1971. But the group still tries to keep active. Earlier this year, it helped raise the money for an electronic sign at 25th and Northampton streets.

Jennifer Stocker, president of the Easton Lions Club, said the group is still going strong despite a drop in volunteers. The group has 26 members right now, about half of when it was formed in 1971. Stocker, 34, said while many of the members are in their 70s, there are some younger volunteers in their 30s and 40s, as well.

Editors Note: Our Uniontown, Ohio Lions Club is still strong and growing. We have added several new members during the current fiscal year and we have a few other prospects that could become members in the next few months. With strong support from the community we are set to be a part of the Uniontown, Ohio landscape for years to come. If you are interested in membership, please fill out our Membership Form

4-year-old Blake Davis (Son of Jessie Davis) has no parents, but he has Jenn a former Uniontown resident

jennOver the past 18 months, Jenn Snyder has established a college fund, collected furniture – and even helped get a home – for the family of 4-year-old Blake Davis.

Snyder didn’t even know Blake until she saw him on television in June 2007.

The Ohio boy’s missing mother had just been found dead. The prime suspect was his father.

“I was sobbing watching the press conference,” said Snyder, 36, of Charlotte. “I thought, ‘This little boy has no mom or dad.’”

She decided to help.

Snyder has spent more than a year collecting money and donations to help Blake and his family in Akron, Ohio.

A trust fund she established – Blake’s Bright Tomorrow – raises money for the boy’s college education. She is also trying to find someone willing to give the family a vehicle to replace their car, which she said often breaks down.

Her effort has already persuaded a mortgage company to donate a foreclosed house to the family. Businesses from Charlotte gave $32,000 to pay the gift tax and help furnish the house.

Celebrities such as singers Tim McGraw and Faith Hill, NBA star Lebron James and Carolina Panthers players Steve Smith and Jake Delhomme contributed autographed items last year that helped her collect $25,000 during a fundraiser.

“It has totally changed my life,” said Snyder, who works as executive director of Hood Hargett Breakfast Club in Charlotte, a business networking group. “I can’t imagine what life would be like without it.”

Blake’s story made national headlines. His mother, Jessie Davis, 26, was nine months pregnant when she went missing from her Ohio home in June of last year. Patty Porter, Blake’s maternal grandmother, found him alone in the duplex two days later.

Davis’ dead body was discovered nine days later about 25 miles away in a national park.

The boy’s father, former police officer Bobby Cutts Jr., was later convicted of murder and aggravated murder of Davis’s unborn child and sentenced to life in prison.

During the sentencing hearing, Porter publicly forgave Cutts, her daughter’s boyfriend and the father of the unborn child.

Porter, 62, is now raising Blake, whom she describes as personable and smart. He can count to 200 and spell names of all his family members, she said.

Blake also asks questions about what happened to his parents.

“We never lie to him,” Porter said. “He knows Dad’s in a long time-out. He’s progressed to Dad’s in jail.”

Snyder grew up in Uniontown, Ohio, a small blue-collar town not far from where Blake lives. Her parents still live there.

Blake’s story gripped the town. Thousands signed up to search for Davis’ body.

“My dad got choked up on the phone telling how all these people were searching,” said Snyder, who has lived in Charlotte for 11 years. “These were people who didn’t have a lot of money taking time off their jobs.”

Snyder wanted to do her part, so she started organizing a silent auction in Ohio. It was held in July 2007.

She persuaded business associates to give jewelry, a television and other merchandise. Homebuilders and other volunteers agreed to renovate the family’s new house, furnish it and buy play equipment for the backyard.

Her boss, Chuck Hood, allowed her to work solely on the fundraiser for three weeks.

“She became so passionate about it,” Hood said. “She was not going to be content until she had done it 110 percent.”

On the day of the fundraiser, Snyder and other volunteers surprised Blake’s family with the three-bedroom, split-level house. Six family members previously had been living in a two-bedroom apartment.

When Porter saw the laundry room with a washer and dryer, she turned to Snyder and hugged her. Porter had never owned her own house and did not have a washer and dryer.

“She said, ‘My daughter would have loved you so much,’” Snyder said. “It was an amazing moment between us.”

But perhaps the biggest gift, Snyder says, is the relationship between her and Blake’s family. Snyder and family members said they talk at least once a week by phone and she visits their home every few weeks. They are planning a pajama party to celebrate Christmas together.

“She is like one of my daughters,” Porter said.

Snyder keeps a card that Blake wrote for her. On one half of the card, he traced his hand and wrote, “I love you.”

Uniontown Company to Open $100M bleach plant in Pittsburg

A $100 million bleach manufacturing plant will be built and operated by K2 Pure Solutions at Dow Chemical Co.’s Pittsburg site.

K2 will build and operate the plant on 15 acres leased from Dow on its 513-acre east Contra Costa County site. Dow will supply raw materials.

The new plant will sell bleach mainly to municipal water treatment plants in Northern California. It should be operational by the end of 2010.

Seperately, K2 will lease to Dow an additional separate facility K2 will operate to make chlorine and caustic soda for Dow’s agricultural markets.

Howard Brodie, K2’s chief executive officer, said the 20-year agreement should provide about 200 direct and indirect construction jobs and approximately 40 direct and indirect permanent operations jobs.

Dow, the $53.5 billion chemical giant based in Midland, Mich., said Dec. 8 as part of a global reduction it would close its Pittsburg latex operation, costing 20 jobs. The latex plant had been idle since August. Dow has 500 employees and contactors in Pittsburg.

Dow has nine production units left after the latex plant shut down, said Randy Fischback, Dow’s California public and government affairs leader.

The K2 plant “will be a new unit on site; its footprint every bit as robust as our larger plants.”

Dow operated a global-scale chlorine production plant in Pittsburg for 50 years, before closing it in 1992.

The new plant will have to get city and regulatory agency approvals, Fischback said.

Tod Sutton, Dow’s Pittsburg site leader, said Dow will get “a stable, onsite, low-cost raw material supply by working with K2,” and that “sharing capital costs is consistent with Dow’s asset-light strategy and provides Dow better raw material integration at the Pittsburg site.”

While chlorine and bleach may be the same thing, chlorine is a deadly gas, mostly made in the Gulf, and shipped by rail.

K2’s technology “eliminates the public safety risk,” said David Cynamon, K2 executive chairman.

Cynamon and partner Brodie founded KIK Custom Products in 1997, a Concord, Ontario, company that grew to $1.5 billion in sales and is North America’s largest contract manufacturer of private label household bleach, personal care and household cleaning products. The duo sold KIK with its 25 plants in May 2007 to CI Capital Partners LLC of New York.

“We knew chlorine,” Cynamon said, “We were the largest store brand bleach manufacturer in North America.” Along with Centre Partners, their original partners at KIK, Cynamon and Brodie founded K2 and put to use their knowledge of bleach-making.

K2 is based in Toronto, Ontario, with U.S. headquarters in Uniontown, Ohio. It has 15 employees and, besides Pittsburg, plans to open bleach plants in Vernon in Southern California and later Chicago.

K2 makes bleach using only salt, water and electricity as the inputs.

K2’s plan is to reduce the need to transport chlorine for water treatment by setting up a network of regional plants using its safer method of bleach production.

While early-stage technologies are often expensive — windfarms and solar power, for example — K2 is able “to create products at no extra cost to taxpayers,” Cynamon said.

Shipping chlorine by rail isn’t allowed in Europe and Asia, he said, something that may happen in the United States.