Lions Club eye programs help needy see a better future

AUBURN CA – For nearly 100 years, the Lions Clubs International has worked on projects designed to prevent blindness, restore eyesight and improve eyecare for hundreds of millions of people worldwide.

Closer to home, its program for helping needy people in obtaining prescription eyeglasses plays a low-key role in helping give many the gift of better sight during tough economic times for some.

Individual clubs have their own programs and some are seeing an increase in need as jobless numbers have swelled while other clubs are not.

The Auburn 49er Lions club averaged 18 referrals a year in 2009 and 2010 but that increased to 25 in 2011, said eyeglasses coordinator Kelly Post. This month, there have been seven calls for glasses.

Post said that a number of reasons could be responsible for the increase. Until two years ago, Medi-Cal’s welfare medical program paid for eye exams and glasses. Now it pays for just the eye exams, she said.

Some of the calls could be attributed to an increase in word of mouth among people needing eyeglass assistance. Others are coming because of referrals from groups assisting the poor like Hope, Help and Healing and The Gathering Inn, Post said.

“More people are homeless, more are out of a job,” Post said. “And there are more parolees.”

At the Loomis Lions Club, Vision Assistance Chair

 

No spike in Loomis

Jack Morris said the group has handled four aid requests since July, with one of the callers finding another way to replace their broken frames.

In Auburn, the Host Lions group had fielded six requests since the end of December – which is depleting the limited amount of referrals that the Lions can send to an optometrist, said eyeglass chairman Dennis Lloyd. The group has the ability to handle about 20 referrals a year, he said.

Dr. Mark Starr, county Health & Human Services deputy director, said Placer has not had an eyeglass program for the needy but will steer them in the direction of the Lions on an informal basis. The county will provide emergency medical eyecare but doesn’t provide eyeware, Starr said.

Lloyd said the number of requests seemed to be linked to an increase in referrals from the county.

“We can handle a limited number of people but we’re not part of the welfare system,” Lloyd said.

Morris said that many Loomis Club members felt a worsening economy and lack of jobs would result in a substantial increase in requests for vision assistance. But there has been no spike in requests. The Loomis Lions normally handle three or four a year, he said.

One of the recent requests had been forwarded by another Lions Club and another by a welfare-related organization, Morris said.

Morris said that different communities have different rates of awareness on the Lions vision program and that could have something to do with a lack of increased demand.

“I think there are many needy persons but I’m thinking they have other ways – paying for them themselves or with insurance, for instance,” Morris said.

He added that the granting of funds for an exam and new glasses – which averaged $190 last year – is not automatic. The club needs to confirm the person’s identification and then move forward on an eye exam. If the optometrist says glasses are required, Morris can authorize the purchase.

“After that, there are no further requirements – they don’t need to come and talk to the club,” Morris said. “But most of them find a way to send us a card.”

The Lions have gained worldwide recognition for their work to improve sight and prevent blindness. That work includes recycling eyeglasses, supporting Lions Eye Banks that provide eye tissue for sight-saving surgeries, and screening the vision of hundreds of thousands of people every year.

The effort goes back to 1925, when Helen Keller called on the Lions organization to become “knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness.”

“It’s a very rewarding thing and we Lions are proud of it,” Morris said.

Happy 90th birthday, Montrose, CO Lions Club!

Montrose ColoradoUnder the leadership of several business and professional people with lawyer H. W. Catlin at the helm, an organizational meeting was held at the Masonic Hall, resulting in a unanimous decision to form the Montrose Lions Club. They received their charter 90 years ago on Nov. 13, 1921, in the basement of the Methodist Church. Their first project was providing turkeys to the needy that Thanksgiving.

Each member lives by the Lion Code of Ethics and follows the goal, which is simply “We serve.” The name Lions is derived from their slogan, Liberty, Intelligence, Our Nation’s Safety.

In 1925, Helen Keller challenged the Lions Club International to become “Knights of the Blind.” Throughout the world, the challenge was accepted, with Lions Clubs providing eye exams and glasses for the needy. Some might recall the mop and broom sales held by our local club, starting around 1962, selling assorted cleaning supplies for the Industries for the Blind. The Montrose club is recognized as one of the top clubs in District 6 West, as well as throughout the state.

One of their very special projects was helping Fred Frye, an ambitious man who was blind and selling newspapers out of an orange crate along Main Street. In October, 1937, the local Lions built him a proper news stand, which helped to expand his business with the sale of not only newspapers but magazines, candy, cigars, etc. Fred made enough profit to make monthly payments to the Lions, reimbursing their initial expenses.

Charter member Dr. Fred Schermerhorn attended the state Lions convention in 1922, returning to tell the local group, “I got mighty tired of hearing delegates from the big eastern towns getting up and saying that they ought to be considered as the next convention town because they were on the main road to Estes Park … I told them I very much regretted that Montrose wasn’t on the road to Estes, but it was on the main road to prosperity and because of that it should be considered as a meeting spot.”

In 1922, the Montrose Lions recognized the need for a Tourist Park since people were starting to travel by automobile, carrying camping equipment in order to pitch a tent wherever they might be when the sun went down. The city map showed a vacant lot on North Nevada Avenue, deeded to the city from David G. Peabody in November 1889. It was full of weeds and cut up by an arroyo. With permission from the City Council, the Lions cleaned up the block, put in a driveway and parking places, and did some lawn, tree and flower planting. City water was brought to the park, and rest rooms were built. Four fireplaces for cooking and cement tables and chairs were installed with proceeds provided by Van Derber Motor Co., the First National Bank, Brown, Nichols and Bloom Service Station and Reinhold & Galloway Grocers. The new facilities were covered with rustic roofing. Camping fees were 25 cents a night.

Next, the Lions built their own clubhouse on the grounds. The foundation was laid in early 1925, and the building was completed that same year. The fireplace and cobblestones were donated by C. B. Akard. Although some material was donated, most was furnished by club members, as was the labor. The park was renamed Lions Park in 1932. Over the years, additions have been made to the building.

A very important, huge project completed by the Lions Club was that of making the nearby Black Canyon accessible by building a seven-mile road along the rim with the encouragement of members, the Rev. Dr. Mark Warner and Dex Walker. Started in 1928, the road was completed and opened in August 1930. Fast forward to the 1980s when the club once again contributed to spruce up the corner turnoff from U.S. 50 to the Black Canyon, hauling off old toilets, building new facilities, making an interpretive display, erecting a large sign and installing picnic tables and garbage cans.

Due to the Great Depression, the club folded in November 1935, but it was re-chartered in May 1937. From that day forward, the Lions have made countless contributions to our community.

Lions Club working to fight vision problems

Lions Club Working to fight vision problemsThe Lions Clubs/Lions Club International took on a challenge in 1925 to make fighting blindness a defining cause of its clubs. The guest speaker making that challenge to the Lions group is probably history’s most famous blind person.

Standing before the audience of Lions Club members, Helen Keller told the members to become “the knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness.”

The clubs, which are volunteer organizations, already had dedicated to that cause but took the challenge to the next level. The clubs have numerous projects aimed at preventing blindness, restoring eyesight and encouraging proper eye care. Members recycle eye glasses, support Lions Eye Banks that provide tissue for sight-saving surgeries and support screening for vision.

Programs are in place within the organization designed to research and help fight the onset of cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic eye diseases, corneal blindness and more.

In keeping with the challenge made long ago, local Lions Clubs have helped a Lindsey man. The Lindsey Lions Club, in collaboration with the Fremont Lions Club and the Elmore Lions Club, presented Lindsey resident Mark Cole with $1,350 to help defray the cost of his recent eye surgeries and treatments at the Vision Center in Toledo. Cole has complications from glaucoma.

Lindsey resident and Lindsey Lions Club member Trish Weinstein brought Cole’s situation to the attention of the club that works closely with the other two local clubs. In the past, the clubs also have cooperated to assist a resident in Fremont and a Woodmore Elementary School student with vision problems.

The Pickerington Lions Club will celebrate 65 years Nov. 5

by Nate Ellis 

pickerington LionsThe Pickerington Lions Club will celebrate 65 years of service to the local community with a commemorative banquet next month.

In September 1946, 38 charter members officially formed the Pickerington Lions Club.

Sixty-five years later, the club remains a fixture in Pickerington, and it continues many of the same traditions of its original members, including helping provide eyeglasses and eye exams to those in need in the community.

On Nov. 5, the approximately 45-member club will celebrate its 65th anniversary with a banquet at the Pickerington Senior Center, 150 Hereford Drive.

The event will begin with a social hour at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner at 7 p.m. It also will serve as an opportunity to look back on the history of the Lions Club in Pickerington.

“Every five years, we do a little celebration,” club president Brian Fox said. “What’s interesting about it to me is the club has been here for 65 continuous years.

“They’ve been doing the same things we do today — the eyeglasses, paying for eye exams and just anything that needs to be done in the community.”

The Lions currently are taking reservations for the anniversary dinner, which will include salad, roast pork tenderloin, lasagna, mashed potatoes, vegetables and birthday cake. The cost of the dinner is $20 per person. Reservations can be made by calling Fox at (614) 833-4728 or by sending an email to bfox1964@aol.com.

In addition to dinner and drinks, attendees will receive a limited-edition pin commemorating the Pickerington Lions Club’s 65th anniversary.

“It’s kind of neat to know you’re part of something that stretches way back and continues to do things that need to be done,” Fox said.

In 1946, the Canal Winchester Lions Club was integral in the establishment of the Pickerington Lions because it served as Pickerington’s sponsor.

At next month’s banquet, Jackie Christensen, president of the Canal Winchester Lions Club, will serve as the event’s guest speaker. He will present and comment on Helen Keller’s famous 1925 speech to the Lions International Convention in Cedar Point, Ohio, in which she asked Lions to adopt the cause of the blind.

The banquet also will allow the Pickerington Lions Club to roll out its newly published official history. Written by Fox after extensive research of records going back to the beginning of the club, the book looks at the club’s activities and service to the community from the beginning to present times.

It also contains a historical roster of club members. The club is publishing it through Ancestry.com and will print only the number of books ordered. The book can be ordered for $38 through the club.

“We have had a footlocker at the senior center filled with old records and papers and this and that,” Fox said. “It was chock-full with stuff, but nobody really knew what we had.

“One day, I decided to take it home. It had minutes from past meetings, correspondences and old newsletters going all the way back to the beginning of the club. I started going back and it really was tremendously interesting to me.”

Fox said the book highlights the formation of the Pickerington Lions Club, as well as its decisions to focus on helping the sight-deprived and upgrading what now is known as Victory Park. It also speaks to the club’s commitment to annually provide Pickerington’s Labor Day parade and fish fry, and its adoption of local families in need at Thanksgiving and Christmas.

In addition to the keynote address, dinner and the unveiling of the book, the Lions Club will present its annual “Distinguished Service Award” to a member at the banquet, and Fox said Lions Club members from throughout Ohio are expected to attend.

“We are a service organization and our motto is, ‘We Serve,’” he said. “We take that seriously and we serve the communiity in a number of ways.

“Our members are excited about (the 65th anniversary). It’s like a birthday. You’re happy you’re still around, but there’s plenty of work still to be done.”

nellis@thisweeknews.com

www.ThisWeekNews.com

Happy Helen Keller Day!

Helen KellerIn 1971, the Board of Directors of Lions Clubs International declared that henceforth June 1 would be remembered as “Helen Keller Day.” Lions around the world implement sight-related service projects on Helen Keller Day.
Helen Keller

Born Helen Adams Keller on June 27, 1880 in Tuscumbia, Alabama, USA, the child developed a fever at 18 months of age. Afterwards, Keller was blind, deaf, and mute.

At age six, teacher Anne Mansfield Sullivan of the Perkins School for the Blind was hired as Keller’s teacher. The 20-year-old taught Keller sign language and Braille. The story of the teacher and her pupil has been retold in William Gibson’s play and film, “The Miracle Worker.”

At age 10, Keller learned to speak. Sarah Fuller of the Horace Mann School was her first speech teacher.

In 1898, Helen entered the Cambridge School for Young Ladies. In the autumn of 1900, Keller entered Radcliffe College. She earned a bachelor of arts degree cum laude in 1904.

Throughout the years, Sullivan remained at her student’s side. She formed letters into Keller’s hand for comprehension of textbooks, college lectures, and conversation.
Keller’s Personal Crusade

In 1915, Keller joined the first Board of Directors of the Permanent Blind Relief War Fund, later known as the American Braille Press.

In 1924, the young woman started the Helen Keller Endowment Fund. In the same year, Keller joined the staff of the American Foundation for the Blind as a counselor on national and international relations.

On June 30, 1925, Keller addressed the Lions Clubs International Convention in Cedar Point, Ohio, USA. She challenged Lions to become “knights of the blind in this crusade against darkness.” (Click here to view her entire speech.) She said, “I am your opportunity. I am knocking at your door.”

In 1946, Keller became a counselor on international relations for the American Foundation for Overseas Blind (a sister organization to the American Foundation for the Blind). She traveled to 35 countries.

A movie was made of Keller’s life. “Helen Keller in Her Story” received the “Oscar” award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for best feature-length documentary film in 1955.

Keller made her last major public appearance in Washington, D.C., USA, in 1961. She received the Lions Humanitarian Award for lifetime service.

Keller died on June 1, 1968 at age 87. Her request to the Lions 43 years earlier inspired Lions Clubs International to adopt the Sight Conservation and Work with the Blind Program as a major service initiative.
Helen Keller Memorial Park

In 1971, the Lions of Alabama dedicated the Helen Keller Memorial Park. It is located on the grounds of Keller’s birthplace which is known as Ivy Green. The focal point of the memorial is a bust of Keller with an engraved plaque which states, “I am your opportunity.”

Lions reach out to family

By Cheryl Keenan Editor

FAYETTEVILLE — “We Serve.”

That motto is familiar in communities around the world as the motto of the local Lions Club.

Lions Clubs are most well-known for their support of sight programs, adopted in 1925 following a challenge from Helen Keller. According to Lions Club’s International’s website at www.lionsclubs.org, “Helen Keller addressed the Lions Clubs International Convention in Cedar Point, Ohio, and challenged Lions to become ‘knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness.’ Since then, we have worked tirelessly to aid the blind and visually impaired.”

Beyond their efforts to aid those suffering from vision loss, however, each local Lions Club supports a number of other philanthropic programs.

Locally, the members of the Fayetteville Lions Club recently adopted a crusade that’s near to their hearts: raising funds to support a local family whose 4-year-old son has cancer.

“We’re trying to help out what we can,” said Lion Gary Holliday.

“We do stuff for lots of people,” said Lion Steve Tyra, “so here’s a face we can put on it that’s familiar to our community.”

Dustin Moore has an inoperable tumor in the brain stem/spine area, according to Tyra, and the youngster is required to take extensive radiation treatments to keep the tumor from growing.

“They’re just regular middle income folks with insurance,” Tyra said, “but the bills are running the family in the hold just trying to keep up with it.

“Mom and Dad have both used up all their time off to go to Morgantown for treatment, and the grandparents are helping. When we learned about it, we knew we had to do something.

“It was almost like Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney getting together and saying, ‘We’ve got a place; I’ve got some costumes. Let’s put on a show!’ Before we knew it we had people donating items and we didn’t have anywhere to store them.”

The ‘show’ is set for Saturday, April 2 beginning at 9 a.m. at the Fayetteville Church of God activity building and will include an auction, a flea market and a barbecue sale.

“When you tell the story, people are quick to help,” Tyra said. “They say, ‘How much do you need?’ or “What can I do to help?’”

Among the items donated thus far for the auction are two special celebrity items. Rock musician Alice Cooper has donated a new black Fender guitar which he autographed, and West Virginia University and Los Angeles Lakers basketball legend Jerry West sent the Lions a #44 West Virginia cap in blue and gold, which also is autographed.

Besides the celebrity items, though, the Lions have a number of high-end items up for auction, including an electric hospital bed, solid gold coins, a brand new tree stand, exercise equipment, TVs, VCRs, DVDs, a grandfather clock, compound bows and more.

Several area companies are providing support to the Lions and the Dustin Moore Fund, including Pepsi, which will be providing all the drinks for the day, and Gumbo’s, which will donate 10 percent of its sales for the day to the fund.

“We also have a number of collection canisters up around the area,” Holliday said.

For those who would like to make a donation to the Dustin Moore Fund, Tyra said, you may do so at any Fayette County National Bank branch.

But Tyra said even those who wish to make a donation also should join in the activities on April 2.

“We just really want a good turnout to help this family,” he said.

Lions auction to help boy’s family

Buckley Lions ClubBy Cheryl Keenan For The Register-Herald

“We Serve.”

That motto is familiar in communities around the world as the motto of the local Lions Club.

Lions Clubs are most well-known for their support of sight programs, adopting in 1925 a response to a challenge from Helen Keller. According to the Lions Club’s International’s website at www.lionsclubs.org, “Helen Keller addressed the Lions Clubs International Convention in Cedar Point, Ohio, and challenged Lions to become ‘knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness.’ Since then, we have worked tirelessly to aid the blind and visually impaired.”

Beyond their efforts to aid those suffering from vision loss, however, each local Lions Club supports a number of other philanthropic programs.

Locally, the members of the Fayetteville Lions Club recently adopted a crusade that’s near to their hearts — raising funds to support a local family whose 4-year-old son has cancer.

“We’re trying to help out what we can,” said Lion Gary Holliday.

“We do stuff for lots of people,” said Lion Steve Tyra, “so here’s a face we can put on it that’s familiar to our community.”

Dustin Moore has an inoperable tumor in the brain stem/spine area, according to Tyra, and the youngster is required to take extensive radiation treatments to keep the tumor from growing.

“They’re just regular, middle-income folks with insurance,” Tyra said, “but the bills are running the family in the hole just trying to keep up with it.

“Mom and Dad have both used up all their time off to go to Morgantown for treatment, and the grandparents are helping. When we learned about it, we knew we had to do something.

“It was almost like Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney getting together and saying, ‘We’ve got a place; I’ve got some costumes. Let’s put on a show!’ Before we knew it we had people donating items, and we didn’t have anywhere to store them.”

The ‘show’ is set for Saturday, April 2, beginning at 9 a.m. at the Fayetteville Church of God activity building and will include an auction, a flea market and a barbecue sale.

“When you tell the story, people are quick to help,” Tyra said. “They say, ‘How much do you need?’ or ‘What can I do to help?’”

Among the items donated thus far for the auction are two special celebrity items. Rock musician Alice Cooper has donated a new black Fender guitar that he autographed, and West Virginia University and Los Angeles Lakers basketball legend Jerry West sent the Lions a No. 44 West Virginia cap in blue and gold, which also is autographed.

Besides the celebrity items, though, the Lions have a number of high-end items up for auction, including an electric hospital bed, solid gold coins, a new tree stand, exercise equipment, TVs, VCRs, DVDs, a grandfather clock, compound bows and more.

Several area companies are providing support to the Lions and the Dustin Moore Fund, including Pepsi, which will be providing all the drinks for the day, and Gumbo’s, which will donate 10 percent of its sales for the day to the fund.

“We also have a number of collection canisters up around the area,” Holliday said.

Lions Clubs International 2009 Rose Parade Float

Lions Clubs International 2009 Rose Parade FloatSince 1992, Lions Clubs International has had a float in the New Year’s Day Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, California.  Two of our entries, in 1993 and 1994, won awards for the most beautiful floats in the parade.   But all entries have been winners, presenting Lions an opportunity to promote our service activities to people worldwide who watch the float each year.

The Rose Parade is seen by an estimated 400 million people in 85 countries worldwide.  The parade is covered by several hundred domestic and international newspapers.  Every major newswire service features related stories before, during and after the parade.

Lions Float, Inc., a non-profit corporation, was formed in 1994 to direct the preparation and funding of the Lions float in the Rose Parade.  This is a year-round activity involving the designing, fundraising and coordinating of volunteer decoration of the float in December.

Lions Clubs International in Oak Brook, Illinois has provided approximately half of the funds; the remainder is raised by the Lions of Multiple District Four (California).

FLOWERING:

The “floragraph” depiction of Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan is created with ground onion seed, light lettuce seed, poppy seed and powdered rice; its gold frame and the lion’s head are covered with strawflower, clover seed and ground white rice.

The cane features red strawflower and ground white rice.

The glasses are decorated with silverleaf, and the books are covered with orange lentil, red strawflower and parsley seed – the pages are created with ground rice and poppy seed.

The base of the float is bedecked with roses, daisies and carnations in a mix of orange, gold, pink, lavender, yellow and gold.

Event for the visually impaired has been held annually for more than three decades

By Charles Perry Times & Transcript Staff

Florence Gallant serves the turkey dinner at Saturday’s event.The Moncton Lions Club is modest about the Christmas dinner they provide each year for the visually impaired in the area.

“We really enjoy doing it,” says Lion club member Gloria Paschal. “It is as much fun for us as it is for them,” she said Saturday night, just prior to the annual dinner for visually impaired residents of southeastern New Brunswick and their spouses or family members.

The Moncton Lions and Lionettes totally do everything for this dinner,” said Arlene Hachey of Moncton, provincial president for the Canadian Institute for the Blind. “They buy the food, cook the meal and serve the meal.

“They do it year after year and are happy to do it,” she said.

More than 225 people were on hand for the dinner this year, not just from Metro Moncton but from various parts of Westmorland, Albert and Kent counties.

Paschal said they need about 10 to 12 turkeys and begin working on the meals a few days ahead of time.

“You can’t get that many turkeys out of the freezer, thawed, cooked and ready to serve, overnight,” she said.

Along with the dinner and dessert, she said one of the Lions Club members dresses as Santa Claus and presents a gift to each of their guests.

They wrap up the evening with some carolling, she said.

Clarence Curwin, who has been a member of the Moncton, Lions Club for 34 years, said the relationship between the Lions clubs and the visually-impaired goes back several decades to when famed writer and lecturer Helen Keller, who was both blind and deaf, spoke at a Lions international convention.

Her speech so inspirational, he said, that, since then, at least one Lions Club in most communities became involved with the helping the visually impaired in one way or another.

Curwin said the Christmas dinners for the visually impaired have been provided by the Moncton Lions Club, at least, since he joined it.

Julian Legere of Shediac, who has been visually impaired since birth due to cataracts, recalled going to the dinners back in 1954 and ’55. He said you always meet people you know and get to share common experiences with other blind people.

225 visually impaired people and their guests enjoy a turkey dinner at the Moncton Lions and Lionettes activity centre on Saturday night. It’s the 20th annual Christmas season dinner hosted by Moncton Lions Club members.“This is great, this is amazing,” said his daughter Patsy Legere, who accompanied her father to the dinner, along with her boyfriend Edgar LeBlanc. She had lived in Ontario for 40 years before returning to New Brunswick last year, she said, adding his other daughter Diane took her father to the dinner before that.

Windsor MacDonald of Moncton was accompanied by his daughter Ann Cormier. He said his vision loss began a couple of decades ago, noting he has not been able to drive a car since 1993.

MacDonald said he enjoys the Christmas dinners because he always meets other people there, most often, unexpectedly. A woman he plays cards with, regularly, was there one year with her visually impaired daughter, he said, adding he did not even know before then that she had a daughter who had vision problems.

Cormier said she may soon be able to go to the dinners based on her own condition, noting she has been diagnosed with macular degeneration.

Hachey explained that the macula is a “tiny spot” at the back of your eyes that gives detail to what you are seeing. With macula degeneration, she said you have to learn to make greater use of your peripheral vision to see.

Ludivine Arseneau of Moncton, accompanied by her husband Frank, said she started going to the CNIB the last couple of years as her vision deteriorated.

This marks the first year she was invited to the Christmas dinner and she said she has heard nothing but good things about the event.

Shoot for Sight busy again this basketball season

Published by the Crossville Chronicle Crossville, TN

cumberland county basketballFor 12 years now, high school basketball in Cumberland County has teamed up with the Crossville Lions Club in a project called “Shoot For Sight.”

This worthwhile project provides funding for important eye care services to Cumberland County school children and other deserving individuals.

The basketball teams have exhibited great shooting touch from three-point range for many years.

The Lady Jets will have Kelli Hyder and Taylor Williams returning as deadly long-range bombers, while the Lady Panthers will be looking to replace last year’s sharpshooters, Caitlin Sanders and Lindsay Smith.

The Jets have Jeremy Jacobs coming back as their most dangerous outside threat.

Bradley Sherrill is gone from the Panthers potent long-range attack, but several other players are looking to fill his shoes. Once again this year, these three-pointers will be worth even more than three points on the scoreboard.

The CCHS and SMHS basketball/Crossville Lions Club combination raised over $2,500 last season.

The Lions Club and the basketball teams are asking local businesses and individuals to pledge a given amount for every trey that they make during this coming season.

For example, the four teams made 477 treys last year.

If someone pledges 10 cents per shot and the teams make 477 shots again this year that would amount to a $47.70 contribution to the Crossville Lions Club.

Another option is to donate a specific sum of money for the full season. Every dollar given will help provide vital eye care needs to the people of Cumberland County.

Lions Clubs have long been known for their work in sight conservation. In 1925, Helen Keller addressed the Lions at their annual International Convention, challenging them to become “knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness,” since that time, service to the blind and visually impaired has become one of the association’s most significant activities.

Crossville Lions Club President Carl Cromwell recently stated, “We are excited to team up with CCHS and SMHS basketball to support better eye care for Cumberland Countians. It’s wonderful for young people to take part in a community service project like this.”